Dealing with the stress of Anosmia/Dysgeusia (loss or change in the senses of smell and taste)


Around 3m people in the UK are affected by some form of taste and smell dysfunction.

Some of them people suffer from treatable disorders such as chronic sinusitis or nasal polyps while others may have experienced permanent or long-term damage caused by ear surgery, injury to the mouth or nose, or as side-effects drugs such as captopril, lithium, procarbazine and certain drugs used in the treatment of cancer.

To get the medical terminology out of the way, Ageusia is the complete loss of sense of taste, Dysgeusia is distortion of the taste of things and Hypogeusia is a decrease in taste sensitivity. Anosmia is the inability to detect odours and as such, it  can either be an issue in its own right or else a major contributor to taste disorders.

Whether the problem is that of taste or smell or both, it can be extremely distressing for sufferers. Our enjoyment of food is focussed around taste and smell and without those we are just left with the texture and temperature of the food and the feeling of fullness it give us. Other than that, a large part of the pleasure is missing and many sufferers of Anosmia/Dysgeusia lose all interest and enjoyment in food and eating. And that is aside from the loss of enjoying a whiff of scent from a flower or a teasing hint of perfume in the air or the smell of fresh ground coffee or new baked bread or the scent of a new born baby’s skin.

With loss of these pleasures there often come feelings of frustration, anger, depression and grief. People with these problems will often withdrawn from socialising because so much of social life is focussed around celebratory meals, restaurant outings, enjoying a good glass of wine with friends, appreciating a gift of flowers and so on.

Impairment of taste and smell can also affect jobs and careers – the inability to smell or taste while working in hazardous environments where a smell of burning or taste of gas in the air is an early indicator of something being wrong makes employment in mining, gas, oil or chemical industries difficult. A doctor or paramedic being unable to smell alcohol on someone’s breath could lead to their misdiagnosing the reasons for a patient’s erratic behaviour and lead to serious errors in diagnosis and treatment. Any impairment of taste or smell can be dangerous not only for the sufferer but also for their colleagues and the people relying on their services.

Hypnotherapy cannot do anything to help restore functionality of sense of smell or taste but it can do a lot to help mitigate the sense of loss and anger and frustration at its happening. It can help those who have not totally lost their sense of smell or taste to optimise their remaining faculties so that they can make the most of enjoying what they can. It can also help stimulate their recall and enjoyment of those smells and tastes which they can no longer experience directly – the mere sight of a highly spiced meal bringing back memories of enjoyment and appetite without the need for the full taste/smell experience.

Post hypnotic suggestion can also be used to encourage those with partial taste/smell functions to remember all those times that they have a really satisfying taste/smell experience and to be far less aware of the unsatisfactory ones.

In these ways, quality of life can be optimised and feelings of loss, grief and anger minimised.

If any of my readers have any experience of these disorders or their treatment I would love to hear from you. Just leave me a Comment describing the causes of your problem and the emotions they engendered and how you found your own personal coping strategy. I’d also be interested to know whether or not you feel that the type of therapy described here might have been of benefit to and the reasons why/why not.

PS  update June 2017.  I have just come across an organisation called FifthSense (fifthsense.org.uk) which has beenmailinglist@fifthsense.org.uk set up to provide information and latest news on developments in the world of Anosmia.

A Different Approach to Sleep Problems


Having constructed quite a large page on my website (www.keithjeffordhypnotherapy.co.uk) about sleep issues, I thought that I had run out of things to say about the topic.  However, a couple of recent clients have reminded me that when it comes to the brain, there is no end to the ways in which we can bring rapid change to peoples lives.

The clients who drew this to my attention both suffered similar problems – a history of going to sleep and napping for 15 minutes or sometimes an hour and then waking up feeling fully refreshed and alert.  The rest of the night would be spent tossing and turning dreading how bad they would feel next day.  The day-times, needless to say, were spent dreading the coming bedtime and the strong fear that they wouldn’t sleep then either.  Both had good jobs which weren’t too stressful (by today’s standards!), had good childhoods and family situations and had experienced their problems for a decade or more.

They had done all the usual things recommended in books and one had had hypnosis, which had been successful for a while but had gradually been eroded by his bad old ways.

What caught my attention was that both clients “lived by the clock” and thus went to bed at exactly the same time each night (as recommended by the experts) and rose at the same time every morning.   When I enquired into this further, I found that they both became quite distressed if their “sleep” routine got disturbed – even going to the extreme of leaving parties and family events early so that they could get home by bedtime.  

On relflecting about what I could do to help these clients who seemed to have tried everything, it occured to me that their problem was not a lack of functionality (they could sleep well when ill or on holiday) but a very strong anxiety about not sleeping.

So I decided to categorise their lack of sleep as a symptom of what was really wrong with them and concentrate on dealing with the cause of  the problem – their hyper-anxiety about the consequences of losing a night’s sleep,

Having explained this to my clients individually, I then made them tailor-made mp3 recordings which addressed their own particular issues and made it clear that it might take a little while until normal sleep patterns returned  (because our first job was to make them care less and less  about not sleeping and then allowing normal sleep to return quite naturally). 

Client One, unfortunately, fell victim to his own anxiety to rid himself of this long term problem.  Having felt no change after two sessions, he decided to quit and look elsewhere for a solution.  

Client Two, however, persevered and by session 3 was reporting that although he still wasn’t sleeping any better, he felt much more relaxed about it and realised that in reality, he didn’t really feel that bad at losing sleep and that he was less anxious about it, even to the point of looking forward to going to bed.  By session 5 he reported that that he had achieved not only one, but  a number of consecutive nights sleep where he had slept deeply and continously.  Whereas he had previously been self-medicating with alcohol to try to make himself sleep, he had succeeded without it and without using the mp3 I had made him.  At that point we terminated treatment and agreed that if the problem should begin to return, he’d contact me for further reinforcement.

These cases taught me several lessons…

i)  In treating any emotional disorder, it is important to clearly separate the symptom from the cause of a problem.  In this, inability to sleep was not the problem but merely a symptom;  the real problem was an overwhelming anxiety around the whole issue of sleeping.  By treating the anxiety, sleep followed.

ii)  Both clients wanted hypnosis to provide a quick fix.  Client One was not willing to invest  time in seeing if he could reduce his levels of anxiety in order that he could sleep properly.  This is no criticism of the client;  I see it quite often in people who are so anxious to deal with a problem that their anxiety for a speedy fix means that they go from one treatment to another without ever giving something the time it needs to work.  It’s a bit like taking an antibiotic and expecting it to work in two doses instead of the fourteen or twenty one it requires to do its work.  In contrast to many other therapies, hypnotherapy is a quick fix, but change only happens at the speed that the subconscious mind will allow (see Who’d win a fight between the Subconscious and Conscious Mind?” later in this blog).   So in future, I need to spend more time enouraging anxious/time conscious clients to be kind to themselves and loosen their hold on time/speed and their anxiety for a quick fix/rapid change.

Just as being told “not to think about Pink Elephants” generates an immediate mental image of pink elephants, so insisting that sleep will happen at exactly 11pm will result in sleep not happening at 11pm or maybe not at all.   By not caring about going to sleep and allowing it to naturally occur (perhaps with the help of a relaxation or hypnosis recording), the natural order of things is reinstated and sleep becomes an enjoyable and relaxing part of the day again, just as it was in childhood.   (As an interesting aside, both clients slipped easily into hypnosis…a natural sleep state!).

iii)  Finally, this experience reinforced the view that “letting go” is the hardest part of therapy for both client and therapist.  Letting go of a fear or phobia, an anxiety or a mistaken belief can immediately remove a problem.  As long as the subconscious mind has decided that whatever it fears or feels frustrated about not receiving is no longer important – that it is no longer a serious threat or a vital need – then it will change its response from one of anxiety and stress and fear to become accepting and relaxed and happy.  Fear of flying becomes relaxed about flying.  Believing one is unlovable and thus  rejecting anyone who tries to offer love,  becomes accepting that it is possible to be loved and to thus accept love when it is offered.  And, of course, anxiety about sleeping becomes the ultimate “letting go”, to enter into restful, peaceful relaxation and deep, fulfilling sleep. 

We should all have one of these….


This is a great idea.  If only we could get it miniaturised and slide it into our hippocampus and wire it up to our limbic system.  Bingo!  Instant sunshine every day…

http://www.psfk.com/2012/10/happiness-machine-internet-printer.html

How being a Perfectionist can damage your life


I attended a course last weekend which started me thinking about how much we all damage ourselves and our quality of life by indulging in Perfectionism.   We often think of Perfectionists as having some form of OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) where all can labels in the cupboards have to face forward and the cans and bottles have to be ranked in size order and by colour and content.

Most of us have some element of the Perfectionist within us – liking a tidy home or desk or having a regular place to put the kitchen scissors.  This type of behaviour helps us have more efficient and pleasant lives and avoids wasting hours of effort trying to find a roll of Cellotape.

However, our Perfectionism can become a problem when we start to apply it to ourselves and how we feel the world should treat us.  For instance, when the mechanism of the subconscious (which builds our map of the world and the everyday rules for living), starts to create rules which build an unrealistic expectation about the world around us and the way it should (must) treat us.

If we aren’t careful, we can begin to construct unrealistic rules for ourselves and then try to live by them, expecting the world to treat us well in return.  Examples of these beliefs could be  “I should never turn down the chance of doing something” or  “It must be 100% right.  Not even a tiny error is acceptable” or “My employer must always treat me well because I am a such a good worker and he really values my contribution”.

The result of creating these types of rule is that you put a massive amount of pressure on yourself and those around you to deliver something which is, in reality, unachievable.

“I should never turn down the chance of doing something” means that instead of having a varied and interesting life you are manically running/driving from one event to another.  Getting up early to get somewhere; leaving that event early to get somewhere else; frantically changing clothes for the next activity;  driving furiously to get somewhere else; always looking at the clock, cursing buses, trains and planes for being late; fretting and agitated in traffic jams; dragging friends and family around behind you in a frantic hurry to get somewhere and do something else rather than the thing you are actually doing!

Many people also apply this same “never turn anything down” rule to their work lives by never turning down a job or a project.  Clients tell me “it’s because they know I’m the only one who can  do it,”  “It’s my area of expertise”, “no one else can meet that kind of deadline”.  What they are really telling me is that their employer is exploiting their mistaken belief.  The Manager handing out the work probably thinks that my client is a mug for taking on more and more work; that they don’t really care what happens to one of their team when they eventually break down.  That as long as the job gets done and the Manager looks good, they’ll keep on piling on the work.  If it all goes wrong, they can blame the overworked and Perfectionist who has moved heaven and earth to make sure that they deliver a 100% perfect job.

The self-delusion that one is valued at work and that a company cares still runs deep in the veins of many employees, despite the evidence in front of them every day.  They will tolerate bullying, abuse and overwork because they fear the effort of finding a new job and lack the confidence to rise to the challenge of being given tasks without the right training, timescale or resources.  The chances are that if your boss never has to say “do it or I’ll find someone else who will” when loading another massive burden on your already overburdened back, then it’s YOU who’s the one taking on the work others have already said is impossible to do in the time/for the money/without more resource etc!

Another corrosive belief is that “it must be 100% right, otherwise the rest of what I’ve done is useless and worthless and I am a useless and worthless person who doesn’t deserve thanks or praise”.   No amount of praise can be meaningful to his kind of Perfectionist.  It rolls off them as their subconscious mind rejects what it sees as hollow words from people who  “just don’t know how much better the result could have been if only I could have done a better job”.  This creates in the Perfectionist a deep well of frustration and dissatisfaction with everything in their lives.  They feel bad all the time.  They might turn to drink, drugs, sex or food for comfort in order to achieve that elusive feeling of control over their lives. They might begin to blame others for their lack of perceived achievement, or break up relationships or just work harder and harder until they eventually break down.

The payback which comes from all this manic behaviour is often the firm belief that “My employer must always treat me well because I am a such a good worker and he values my contribution so much”.  Perfectionists believe this of their families too “because I work until 2am every night cleaning the kitchen the family must love me more and show me their appreciation”.

But because everyone views the Perfectionist as neurotic and unreasonable, they don’t value that person more.  In fact, they probably value them less than they would if they just worked 9-5 in the office and spent their time enjoying relaxation with the family playing games and doing trivial things.

As I’m always telling my clients, it’s OK to want to do things to the best of your abilities, but only within the context of the time, energy and other commitments that you have.

If you find yourself under constant pressure, ask yourself why.  What are the beliefs which are driving you to be under that pressure?  What makes the rules you’ve created for yourself true?  What less pressing rules could you create?  Are the rules you are currently living your life to actually out of date – were they right for when you were younger but are they appropriate to life as it is now?

Try writing down the rules which trouble you most and think about them.  How much do they ruin your life?  What would happen if you didn’t obey them?  What would you lose  AND, more importantly, what would you gain?

Why not take a look at the Perfectionist in your own life, and see how your own work and home life could be improved?

Painkiller Headaches & Hypnosis


This week has seen media coverage of a problem affecting up to 1m people in the UK who are suffering from “completely preventable” severe headaches caused by taking too many pain killers.

“Medication Overdose Headaches” have been brought to public attention by the latest NICE (National Institute of Clinical Excellence) Guidelines on the topic.

It may surprise readers to learn that no one knows exactly how painkillers work or how it affects the brain in the treatment of headaches.

The new NICE Guideline to GPs is that patients suffering from MOH be advised to stop taking painkillers immediately, despite the fact that they run the risk of suffering potentially agonising pain as the headaches continue without the benefit of analgesia.  Having been through this period of withdrawal, symptoms are expected to gradually improve if not disappear altogether.

Dr Massio Riccio, a leading addiction specialist at the Priory Clinic in Roehampton is quoted by the BBC News website as saying that “those trying to kick a serious codeine habit may suffer symptoms not dissimilar to someone weaning themselves off a class A drug.  You may well experience increased perspiration, cold sweats, stomach cramps, a runny nose, and generally feel unwell.  Psychologically you may feel more irritable and may not sleep well”.

If YOU think that you might be affected by the problem of MOH then the first thing to do is to consult your doctor for a proper diagnosis.

If you are advised to stop taking painkillers with immediate effect and suffer painful withdrawals symptoms, you might consider consulting a hypnotherapist.

Hypnotherapy can help in a number of ways:-

  • For Tension headaches, it can help you relax and release the tension which is creating the pain.  It can also be used to help you deal with the source of the anxiety causing the tension and thereby help provide a long term solution to the problem.
  • Migraine can also be helped by hypnosis.  In addition to release tension caused by an attack it can also help reduce the fear of future attacks and help you deal with the severity of the current  symptoms,  including the nausea and sensitivity to light and sound which accompanies it.  It can also help you deal with the stressful things which might bring on an attack and teach you ways of protecting yourself from frequent re-occurrence.
  • For those suffering from Cluster headaches (causing swelling around the eyes – making them red and watery – together with  severe pain around the eyes and sides of the face)  it can help reduce the stress of the attacks and the sensitivity to the pain it produces.

For all kinds of headache conditions I always teach a variety of pain control techniques and self-hypnosis to help put the client more in control of their own particular set of triggers and symptoms.

If you’d like to know more about how hypnotherapy can help you, please refer to my website at wwww.keithjeffordhypnotherapy.co.uk

Dealing with Anger issues


I’ve recently been dealing with a number of clients who have anger management issues and as a result have spent a lot of time trying to identify the most effective ways of defusing their anger.

Some people, of course, are just hardwired to have a short fuse, they are often very manipulative and turn violent if they don’t get their own way.  These are best left to proper psychiatric care.

For a lot of people though, anger is a natural emotional  response to events or issues which have shaken their world, creating issues which remain unresolved for years after the event and which gradually fester into a habitual sense of impatience and intolerance with the world around them.

Anger presents itself in sudden flare ups and inappropriate aggression towards to everyone from partners and children to shop staff and call centre operators.  Sufferers have an extremely low tolerance threshold of anything which requires them to deal with an issue, however trivial..  Those who are tolerant by nature suddenly become intolerant.  Those who have always had enormous patience suddenly start throwing things around in frustration or  threatening others with violence.  Frequently this violence is only verbal but sometimes it can go further.

By the time they reach my consulting room sufferers are usually at a cross-roads in their relationship – their partner has told them to get treatment or the relationship will be at an end. Sometimes, their partner has already found someone else, having been driven away by the frustration and fear induced by walking on eggshells every time Mr Angry is around.  At other times they might have been forced to seek treatment as a result of a restraining order or other court instruction.

When they sit down for their first consultation, sufferers are normally in a pretty poor state, feeling helpless and depressed, confused and fearful for their relationship, their family, the impact which their problems has had on their friends and colleagues at work –  their entire future in fact.  Some readily acknowledge their problem; other remain in denial that they have anything other than a low tolerance level for certain types of “provocation” or situation.

My job as a psychotherapist is to first establish the extent and intensity of the anger they experience and whether or not is hardwired or emotionally driven.   I then  identify the triggers which create the outbursts and the internal language which  it generates in the client, and the people who are most likely to be the targets.

From there I need to identify the type of fuel which is powering their anger.  Often it is quite apparent – the sudden death of a parent or very close friend or the loss of a child.  Redundancy is another common cause – it  can have a disastrous impact on someone’s sense of self-worth and identity.  Men in particular seem to have very fragile egos – they are often identified by their jobs – they are their jobs.  When those jobs are taken away, they become totally lost.  They seem like ghosts, with no idea of who they are or what they should be doing.  They become angry and frustrated at their ex-employers, their managers, the company and most importantly, at themselves for their seeming impotence, confusion and lack of direction and purpose.  These feelings then combine with all the unspent energy which would usually get used up during a busy working day to create a highly volatile cocktail of anger.

In addition, being let down by a trusted business partner, being ripped off by a crooked salesman resulting in the loss of income, house and the subsequent esteem of friends and family can make a normal loving father into a seething mass of anger – ready to erupt at the slightest provocation. This time the anger is fuelled not by loss of identity but at having the very roots of his masculinity challenged – he’s been duped, made to look a fool, lost respect amongst his family and peer.  His primitive instinct is to strike back, release the pent up rage in an orgy of physical violence against whoever caused him the hurt.  But he can’t do that; society doesn’t allow it.  And so he has to lock it up inside him where he tried to bury it, only for it to burst out in the  form of violent rage and anger.

Having got to this point of understand, both for myself and the client, I will usually use hypnosis to help the client release all this anger against an individual or situation in a safe way, by helping them to create scenarios and visualisations which allow them to burn off their anger, often in just a single session.  They can, in imagination, express their thoughts and feelings, rampage around, scream and yell, do whatever they feel they need to do to unlock their feelings, express them in their imagination and then emerge feeling cleansed and revitalised.

Having achieved this, they are they taught different ways of regaining control of themselves in difficult situations.  How to avoid indulging in knee-jerk responses to perceived provocation and learning how to take control of a situation before it gets out of hand.

And these sessions don’t need to go on for a long time.  I recently dealt with a case which was resolved in five one-and-a-half hour sessions.  The final session was held with his partner to help her understand how he had undergone such a transformation in  behaviour in such a short time, and to be reassured that without the fuel which drove his anger,  the  change she had observed was to all intents and purposes, permanent.

If you suffer from anger issues and would like to talk more please feel free to contact me via the blog or my website at www.keithjeffordhypnotherapy.co.uk

AN INSPIRING & THOUGHT PROVOKING MOVIE


I watched a tremendous film called Temple Grandin last night on Sky.  It takes us into the world of someone with autism and the extraordinary talents they have.  Instead of the usual Hollywood slush it has a really uplifting hard-edged narrative taking us through her life and her remarkable achievements.  Wikipedia says about her…

Temple Grandin (born August 29, 1947) is an American doctor of animal science and professor at Colorado State University, bestselling author, and consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior. As a person with high-functioning autism, Grandin is also noted for her work in autism advocacy and is the inventor of the squeeze machine designed to calm hypersensitive people.

Grandin is listed in the 2010 Time 100 list of the 100 most influential people in the world in the category “Heroes”.[1]

Look up the film. A very rewarding couple of hours.

UNDERSTANDING TINNITUS – Part 1


This week is Tinnitus Awareness Week in the UK.  Coincidentally, I’ve spent much of January working on a CD to help tinnitus sufferers deal with the sometimes devastating impact of being aware of loud noises coming from inside their heads 24/7.  This blog is drawn from the introduction to the CD and is designed to help those suffering from its effects, or those with a friend or relative who suffers from the problem, to understand it causes.  

Having several friends who suffer from Tinnitus, I have made a particular study of how it works and how hypnotherapy might help sufferers accept it and reduce its impact on their day to day lives.

This blog divides into two parts – the first is a fairly detailed description of the mechanisms which drive Tinnitus.  I’ve found in my researches that it’s quite difficult to get a simple but comprehensive description of how Tinnitus sounds are generated and why they are so different for different people.  If you know about this already, please just skip down to the second part which deals with the ways in which hypnotherapy can help you live with Tinnitus more comfortably.

How Tinnitus Sounds Are Generated

When a sound reaches the human ear, it enters as a pressure wave of vibrating air. This wave is converted into mechanical vibration by the eardrum and then amplified by the hammer/anvil/stirrup structure of the Middle Ear. It then passes into the fluid filled space of the Inner Ear.

Inside this space lie the semi-circular canals which control our balance, together with the complex structure of the Cochlear. It is here that the mechanical vibration of the sound is converted into chemical and electrical energy by a part of the Cochlear called the Organ of Corti. This identifies the pitch of the vibrations passing through it and also, their volume.  This is then converted into a signal which is passed to the temporal lobe of the brain – the part which controls our hearing. Only at this point does our conscious mind becomes aware of the sound for the first time.

Tinnitus occurs because of  a mechanical malfunction inside the Organ of Corti.   Inside the organ is a highly specialised structure containing up to 20,000 receptors, each one with its own tiny hair cell attached.  Each hair is responsible for detecting sound at a set frequency and measuring its volume. This information is then passed directly to its parent nerve receptor (one of the 20,000 mentioned above) and then on to the brain.

These hairs are very sensitive to damage from aging, exposure to overly loud sounds or to certain ototoxic drugs and once they are damaged they do not regenerate.   However, the loss of particular hairs does not mean that we stop hearing sounds at those frequencies.  Instead, the nerve receptor which is attached to a dead hair switches to a default setting which amplifies the sound being sent to the brain.  So it doesn’t matter if the sound is soft or really loud in the real world; it will just be amplified to the one and only high level of volume that the nerve receptor can deliver to the brain.

As a consequence, as hair cells become damaged, certain  frequencies of noise will become unnaturally loud and the brain will become much more aware of them.

You probably already know that your body is not a silent place. You can sometimes hear your own heart beating when your head is resting on a pillow in a quiet room. Sometime you can hear rushing noises in your ears as a result of blood flow, or the movement of air in your ear canals. And it can become even more noticeable if you get anxious. As your heart rate increases, your blood pounds round your body faster and the sounds it produces become more noticeable. Even the hairs in the Organ of Corti itself produce noise as they move around.

This is why Tinnitus noise is a very individual experience. It can be heard in different parts of the head by different people and can range from a high pitched whine to loud thuddings and bangings or low groanings. And the same sounds persist day after day after day.

The Psychological Effects of Tinnitus

As a result of the above, Tinnitus can create strong psychological stress which is caused  by the way our brains evaluate and respond to sounds.  The ability to recognise sound is a vital primitive instinct – it helps us distinguish between the threatening growl of a tiger and the comforting purr of a cat. When we identify a sound, our body responds according to the level of threat the noise seems to represent.

The tiger’s growl behind us, for instance, triggers our “fight or flight” mechanism. It immediately prepares us to either fight the tiger or to run away from it. Consequently our Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) pours adrenalin and stimulating hormones into our bodies, dries up our digestive juices, dilates our pupils and opens the pores on our skin so that we can sweat and cool ourselves more easily as we run etc. In modern life, this response translates into high levels of stress and anxiety.

The kitten’s purr on the other hand, makes us smile and relax. So it does the reverse of the tiger’s growl. It triggers relaxation, and so the ANS pours pleasure-hormones into our body, calming us, slowing our heart rate and relaxing our muscles and minds.

So, every sound we hear get labelled and, if repeated often enough, creates a “conditioned reflex” according to the feelings we associate with it.   This reflex is very sensitive and sophisticated. For instance, even though a mother might sleep through a thunderstorm, she will wake up the moment her child begins to cry.

So, awake or asleep, our minds and bodies are conditioned to respond to the sounds we hear – consciously or unconsciously.

In addition, the way we think of a sound is as flexible as our response to it. For instance, loud music might be really enjoyable at a party, but a hellish din when heard through a thin wall at 2 o’clock in the morning. So the label we put on a particular sound depends on the context in which we hear it and the level of excitement/relaxation it causes.

Because Tinnitus sounds are inside the head, can’t be escaped and are more or less continuous, the mind’s response to the sounds is that they are unpleasant, threatening, unwanted and something to fear and feel angry and sad about – and who can blame it?

The problem it creates however, is that developing the habit of always being unhappy and distressed by the Tinnitus noise becomes a vicious circle. This learned response creates an ever-strengthening cycle of negative responses – starting with a feeling of annoyance and irritation and rapidly progressing to fear, anger and a desire to escape – all of which  makes the sensitisation to the Tinnitus sounds even greater.

In additon, to becoming a reflex response, Tinnitus also creates a self-reinforcing vocabulary of internal self-talk –  “I can’t stand it, it’s driving me mad, I can’t shut it out” etc – every time it’s heard.  This negative language once again alerts the ANS to something bad and so the unhappy feeling just get worse.

Finally, on top of all this, many GP’s will tell their patients that there is no cure for Tinnitus – which is medically correct, but leaves no hope of finding ways of alleviating the symptoms or learning to live in peace with the sounds.

How Hypnotherapy Can Help you Live with Tinnitus

We’ve seen from the discussion above that there are three elements involved in the experience of Tinnitus –  i)  the noise itself and the seeming inability to escape it  ii)  the emotions generated every time the noise is heard and iii)  the apparent lack of control and helplessness which sufferers feel.

As we’ve seen, it’s true that there is no literal way of escaping the noise of Tinnitus.  However, it is possible to change your response to the sound of Tinnitus, to  retrain your hearing to make the sound less intrusive ( a process called by audiologists Habituation) and in doing so, change your body’s emotional response to it.   Thus, by using a variety of techniques, it is possible to learn to live at relative peace with the noises – by learning to be less disturbed by them, to be able to forget about them for longer (if you think about, you probably do experience times during the day when the sounds are less troublesome or not even noticed) and to change your response to them when you do notice them.

Hypnotherapy can help you  learn to make the sound of Tinnitus less threatening, to make the use of masking sounds (Pink Noise) more effective and to help you extend the periods in which you don’t notice, or notice the sounds less  – in the way that sound of air conditioning will gradually fades from your consciousness the more time you spend with it.

Therapy for Tinnitus  begins with a thorough review of your own Tinnitus experience and the words you use to describe it.   At your first session you will be given a CD designed to help you relax your nervous system right down to a pleasant state of relaxation.  The CD will also train you to listen to Pink Noise, which will help mask your Tinnitus sounds and help retrain your auditory memory/awareness networks (the basics of Tinnitus Masking techniques).  It will also help you to ignore the sounds more easily and to be focussed instead on all those times when you just don’t remember hearing the noise. Finally it has a Pink Noise track which you can copy onto a mobile phone or mp3 player to use whenever you are out and about or in bed and want to supress your Tinnitus sounds.

Subsequent sessions  focus on your own particular issues, thoughts and feelings and are designed give you the means of putting you in control of your Tinnitus and help in creating a more positive and optimistic attitude towards your future.

If you or a relative suffer from Tinnitus and would lke to discuss how hypnotherapy can help,  please feel free to give me a call for a free, no obligation, consultation.  See my website www.keithjeffordhypnotherapy.co.uk  for more details.

Obesity, weight loss & why Gastric Bands fail


I am often asked if I offer hypnotic Gastric Band therapy and the answer is always “Yes, but…”.  The reason that I am loathe to offer an immediate gastric band fix is that it runs the risk of leaving the real underlying reason for weight problems unresolved and can therefore be doomed to failure.

Cummerspeck (literally grief bacon) is a German word which describes the mindless eating  which leads to weight problems and obesity in those with untreated emotional trauma.

GPs in the UK are often faced with patients who are desperate to become “normal” and demand quick-fix gastric band or bypass surgery to solve their problems.

Yet having a physical gastric band fitted means making major changes to diet (for instance having to avoid anything with oil or fat in it or else experience vomiting immediately after eating) and having to accept a death rate risk of 1 in 2,000 operations (the most common cause of death being pulmonary embolism) plus the risk of being one of the 1 in 10  patients who will need a further operation at some time due to slippage, erosion, leakage or infection involving the band.

But of more concern perhaps, is the fact that although the patient may lose weight and reduce the risk of heart and endocrine disorders there is mounting evidence that they may suffer ADDED psychological pressure due to loss of their mechanism for dealing with stress, leading to  issues of low self-esteem, relationship problems, dissatisfaction with  body image and ultimately, depression.

The same psychological problems can obviously attach themselves to use of a hypnotic gastric band.  As a result, I always insist that anyone wanting this therapy also does the first three sessions of my standard weight-loss course.  In this way, they have the opportunity to relearn the basic rules of good eating and to come forward with any underlying problems of grief, loss etc which might be driving their behaviour.  Having dealt with those things first and cleared or controlled psychological blockages, the chances of a hypnotic gastric band working are greatly enhanced.

In my view, hypnotherapy should provide support for overweight or obese clients in  a variety of ways:-

•   Firstly, by identifying and dealing with the underlying causes of their obesity – both emotional  (grief, fear, abuse etc) and practical (being unable to read/write, dyslexia, lack of social training etc) – thus providing a combination of therapy and practical help.
•   Secondly, by offering reinforcement – especially if they’ve already had advice from an NHS dietician.  New ways of eating and thinking about food can be reinforced through the creation of hypnotic suggestions based on an individuals eating plan and the breaking of addictions to unhealthy foods like chocolate, fried foods etc.  I find that teaching people to eat like thin people eat, often makes a major difference to their ability to lose weight.
•   Thirdly, through the creation of tailor-made CD’s – designed to reinforce therapy between sessions and provide constant reminders of what to eat, how to eat and all the benefits which weight loss brings, combined with ego-boosting suggestions and encouragement.
•   And finally, but very importantly – Resolution of problems arising –  providing an on-call resource for dealing with practical or emotional problems immediately they arise.

Five things that people regret on their deathbeds


Later on this year I plan to write a blog article on death, fear of it and coping with it.

However, for those of you who wonder what regrets you might have when your turn comes take a look at this brief article on the five greatest regrets express by people with only a few days of life left.

After reading the article, take a few moments to consider how, armed with that knowledge and insight, you might change your own life to avoid having the same regrets.

http://m.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2012/feb/01/top-five-regrets-of-the-dying?cat=lifeandstyle&type=article